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Capt Arthur de Bells Adam (MC)
1885 - 1916


CPL David Wallace Crawford
1887 - 1916


Lce-Corpl John Joseph Nickle
1894 - 1916


Pte 17911 Morton Neill
1897 - 1916


Lieut Edward Stanley Ashcroft
1883 - 1918
Lieut Edward Stanley Ashcroft

2nd Lieutenant Frank Pockett McCormick

  • Age: 28
  • From: Liverpool
  • Regiment: NORTH FUSILS
  • Commemorated at: Thiennes Bc
    Panel Ref: F.10

Homage has been paid by great commanders and by writers who have carefully studied the psychology of the New Armies to the magnificent spirit and soldierly capacity of the volunteers from the office. Born and reared in an atmosphere of peace, unaccustomed to discipline and to hardship, inured not at all to the nerve-wracking horror of death and mutilation, our civilian volunteers revealed in the hour of supreme national crisis the abiding qualities of British blood, the spirit and the fire of generations of fighting ancestors.
To this type of soldier belonged Frank Pockett McCormick, of 7, St. Michael's Road, Aigburth, who less than a month after war broke out left his work in a Liverpool shipping office to enlist at the call of his country, and after an honourable service in the army at the age of twenty eight died of wounds received on August 9th in the last year of the conflict. 

He was the only son of Mr John and Mrs. Ellen McCormick, of Princes Park, Liverpool, and was educated at St Silas' School and at the Liverpool School of Commerce, and at the outbreak of war was employed with Messrs: Elder, Dempster & Co, as a clerk in their stores department at Colonial House, Water Street, Liverpool. When the bugle sounded, like so many of his comrades in the shipping offices, he joined the "Pals" enlisting in the 1st Battalion on 3rd September, 1914. With that unit, which was so shortly to perform brilliant deeds on the battlefields of Europe, he underwent his course of training at various centres in England until November the following year, when he crossed over to France. The regiment was quickly in the front line positions, and took part in all those unspectacular but arduous operations which preceded the greater events of 1916 and onwards. He was still with the "Pals" when the first Battle of Somme opened in July, 1916, the first offensive engagement which was undertaken by the British Army on a stupendous scale.

It was during those operations,--in the storming of Guillemont--that Lieuenant McCormick was wounded in the face. He was sent for treatment in hospital to England, but on his discharge, and having by this time won his stripes, he applied for a commission in early 1917, went through his cadet training at Hertford College, Oxford, and was gazetted to the 18th Battalion Northumberland Fusiliers on November 23rd that year.
While with the forces both in the training camp and at the front Lieut. McCormick was very popular, and his musical abilities added much to the cheerfulness of his comrades. He was a clever pianist, and acted as accompanist for "The Blighties Pierrot Troupe,"  whose concerts enlivened the camp. This company later became celebrated as "The King's Jesters." But he was as capable in soldierly skill. A crack shot, while in training at Grantham and Salisbury he won the competition for shooting, and was awarded a silver cigarette case besides gaining the Cross Guns Badge. 

During the war, on September 15th, 1915, Liuet. McCormick had been married to Miss. Edith Tatham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Tatham of Aigburth, but his new duty at the front was to sever that happy bond on earth at least. In January, 1918, he was again in the fighting line, attached to the 9th Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers, and had to pass through the severest trial the British Army endured throughout the war-- in the period of the great German advance. He had some narrow escapes--on one occasion his revolver was shattered in his hand by a piece of shell-- and received his fatal wound as stated on August 9th.

The occasion was described by his Commanding Officer Lieut. Col W. A. Vignoles, as follows: 
"The company was ordered to place a bridge across a stream -- (Lieut. McCormick's work had been with the engineering section)--between our own and the enemy's line, and to eastablish a bridgehead on the far side. The Company succeededi n getting across, but were met on the other side by very heavy fire."  In this way Lieut. McCormick was hit, and in spite of medical aid died shortly after at the regimental aid-post."   
"Though McCormick had not been very long with the Battalion" testified his Commanding Officer, " we had all learned to appreciate his worth, and the Battalion loses in him a very gallant and capable officer. He was one of the best subalterns in the Battalion. He died doing his duty, like the gallant gentleman he was, setting an example of coolness and bravery to all around him under very trying circumstances.
He was buried at Tannay. His friends lost a good comrade and the nation a good soldier, and a man whose career in the arts of peace promised well.   

The above extract was taken from Liverpool's Scroll of Fame 



Frank joined the 17th Battalion as Private 15535. The 1911 census shows him as a 21 year old clerk living with his parents and his sister Jessie. 

On 22/09/1915  then aged 25 he married Edith Tatham aged 24 at St Michael's in the Hamlet Church. Frank gave his residence at the time as Larkhill Camp.(His best man was also a Pal; Leonard Wilson Blackstone who was a Serjeant in the 19th Battalion and was killed in action on 15th November, 1917 and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial). 

He now lies in Thiennes British Cemetery where his headstone bears the poignant epitaph: "MY CHUM"

His next of kin is shown as Edith McCormick of 7, St. Michael's Road, Aigburth, Liverpool. It is highly probable that it was Edith who placed the epitaph on Frank's headstone. 

He is also commemorated on the War Memorial at St Michael's Church, St Michaels Church Rd, St Michael In The Hamlet, Liverpool

We currently have no further information on Frank Pockett McCormick, If you have or know someone who may be able to add to the history of this soldier, please contact us.

Killed On This Day.

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Pte 52142 Roland Armstrong
19 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Pte 50591 William Henry Birchall
32 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Pte 50193 Joseph Hubert Fotherby
24 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Cpl 265006 John Gilduff
33 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Sgt 57377 David Ross Hodge

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Pte 57421 James Faulds Hunter
24 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Capt Colin Laird
29 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Pte 17888 Benton Madeley
29 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
L/Cpl 27377 David William Vaughan
26 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Lance Corporal 22804 John Albert Cunniffe
24 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Rifleman 26156 Leo Phillips
20 years old

(103 Years this day)
Thursday 20th September 1917.
Pte G/19763 John Woods
19 years old

A total of 16 Pals where killed on this day. View All